Vincent van Gogh exhibition

Before the lockdown was implemented in the UK I visited the Meet Vincent exhibition in London. I’m quite a fan of Vincent van Gogh’s artwork and I think his story is an incredible one and deeply sad. I think that his art is emotive and really beautiful so was keen to go visit and find out more. The exhibition was quite different to what you might expect. There are lots of props and everyone is encouraged to touch and get close to the displays.

Upon arrival you were handed a headset that would activate as you walked around the exhibit, telling you about that period of the artist’s life and what kind of art Vincent would have produced. There was a room that has a video project onto the wall to give you an idea of what the landscape was like as Vincent painted. You could hear the wind rushing through the tall grass and the birds crying in the sky. Another big section was the café Vincent frequented regularly, painting other customers from his table.

Haystacks play a large part in Vincent’s artwork and there were hay bales you could sit on and a large cart filled with hay.

I think my favourite section was the reproduction of his famous bedroom. You could walk into it and it really felt like you were walking in to one of his most famous paintings. It bought back memories of when I tried to draw the chair with a pipe resting on it at school.

The next section was about Vincent’s stay at a hospital after he infamously cut off his ear, having struggled with menial illness. He created many more paintings here during his stay.

The final section was about how the world has fallen in love with his paintings after he died. Vincent van Gogh painted over 2000 paintings during his 10 years as an artist.

I would definitely recommend a visit to this exhibition if you’re a fan, mildly curious or just love beautiful paintings. I really enjoyed my visit and it gave me a much better idea of who Vincent van Gogh was and his struggle through life.

Soaring Seagulls

I took my little nieces to the park on a bright, blustery winter’s day, to help them burn off some energy and to stretch my legs. They started off by racing through a whole flock of seagulls who were happily feasting on bread that someone had dumped. The birds soared in the bright blue sky as my nieces chased them, screeching loudly at being disturbed.

Seagulls

Slices of Time

I recently visited the Now Gallery in North Greenwich to see the Slices of Time exhibition by Emmanuelle Moureaux. I saw this was going to be on months ago and was really looking forward to seeing what would be displayed. I can honestly say, I wasn’t disappointed. The display was made up of thousands of numbers, arranged in colour order creating an amazingly complex, colourful display.

The thousands of individual numbers were all held up by thousands of strings.

The whole piece was really surreal, especially when you looked up close and the numbers and colours overlapped with each other.

I really loved this piece as you could see how complicated it was by all the individual numbers and how it was kept in an orderly way, not only in shape but by rainbow colour too. Organised chaos almost.

The exhibition is free and on until 19th April, and I would definitely recommend a visit.

A Mild Winter

It’s been a very mild winter here in London so far. Usually by now it’s freezing and sometimes there’s even snow. This year, as the temperature hasn’t dropped so much I have been coming across some pretty sights on my lunchtime walks.

I’ve loved seeing these vibrant yellow daffodils emerging and making the grey days seems brighter. On a Sunny day it’s easy to think that Spring has already arrived.

I also spotted these pretty pink flowers that really made me think of Spring, and these very neat vertical flowers that look a little surreal.

As much as it’s lovely to see spring-like flowers so early it does have me a little worried as it’s not normal. Are these effects due to climate change or is it just an odd winter? I think only time will tell.

Here’s to 2019

It’s the last day of 2019 and as always I like to share some of my favourite photos of the year gone by. I know I’ve been somewhat lacklustre in my posting this year but I still was able to visit some lovely places like the quaint Groomsbridge in Kent, the beautiful rose garden in Regents park, and celebrate my cousin’s wedding. I hope you all had an amazing year and were able to tick things off your lists of things to see and do.

Here’s hoping that 2020 is a year and the start of a new decade of happiness, good health, and fullfillment of our dreams. I also hope the world is a more peaceful, calmer place than it has been. Happy New Year to you all.

Winter sunset

One of the things I love in Winter, especially on a cloudless day are the amazing sunsets that I can see from my desk at work. The beautiful shades of orange and yellows that blaze just before succumbing to darkness always makes the London skyline that I can see in the distance even more enticing.

Retro media wall

I came across this ‘wall’ made up of retro mediums; vinyls, video tapes, cassette tapes and cds. It was also made up of old televisions, speakers and radios to compete the look. Coming across this wall was a real blast from the past and I wonder whether kids today will know what some of these even are. A great way of recycling/reusing things no longer used I think.

Autumn Vibes

I’ve had a lack of motivation to post anything lately, feeling like life is a bit dull and uneventful. Walking through the Olympic Park in Autumn though has really perked me up. I love autumn and the changing of the leaves from shades of green to the fiery colours of red, orange and yellow which shimmer like gold in the sun. I also discovered an amazing wall of red leaves and some unusual mushrooms sprouting up which was a fun find.

Freize Sculpture 2019

Regent’s Park was host to the Frieze Sculpture event again this year. I’ve enjoyed the artworks displayed in previous years so decided to take a look to see what was on offer this time. The park has been called a museum without walls and it seems like that’s just what it is with artworks surrounded by greenery.

There were some interesting pieces on show; one that caught my eye was a golden cello made of bees. I also liked the giant toy car and I really liked what the Superhero Cog woman represented by strong, stable cogs

Other pieces that stood out to me included the large Japanese cartoon character, My Melody, and the weather vanes that had inspiring words on them. I also thought that the Laura Asia’s Dream sculpture of a large face set at an angle was quite skillfully made.

My favourite artwork was a quintessentially English ball that represented a country house. I love how neat it has been tied up into a ball.

I thought the giant blue egg was cool, it was supposed to emit sounds that a baby bird in an egg would make but I couldn’t hear anything myself.

Other sculptures made you think, like the bridges which you could also walk over, words about climate change carved in them.

Another piece that I thought was quite immersive and one of the highlights was One through Zero, which consisted of giant bronze numbers in a circle, like a clock.

I thought some of the sculptures in this year’s Frieze were fun, interesting and quite unique, and I enjoyed looking at and contemplating what they stood for. I look forward to seeing what next year brings.

Queen Mary’s rose garden

I went to Regent’s Park earlier this year, when flowers and trees were all beginning to bloom at the start of spring. I passed by Queen Mary’s rose garden and told myself that I should come back when the roses had grown. A few weeks ago I did just that.

Queen’s Mary’s rose garden is the largest in London and you can see that it was, there were dozens and dozens of different kinds of roses, all shapes and colours, some fragrant others not so much, each one was wonderful in it’s own way.

My favourite was probably the beautiful ombre rose, which had the colours of a sunset, and was one that I’d never seen before.

Each type of rose had a name, some I forgot to check but the ones that I did spot were quite fun; Ingrid Bergman, Scent-sation and Valentine Heart among some. The Pride of England rose bush was huge with big red roses all over. The other rose that caught my eye was called Nostalgia, which was red at the bottom and white in the centre. It made me think of Alice in Wonderland’s ‘painting the roses red’ song.

Another rose that also stood out was one called Gorgeous, which I thought really was. With roses growing in close bunches it looked like one vibrant coloured flower.

There were also some mini roses growing from the tops of wooden frames near some benches and others that smelled amazing like the yellow roses.

There were so many other roses that I didn’t get a chance to see, either because I’d left my visit too late and they had diminished, I couldn’t find them and because I eventually ran out of time. The visit to Queen Mary’s rose garden was really amazing and I truly loved seeing all the beautiful roses that bloomed in such variety after I’m sure a lot of love and care from the gardeners. I think it’s become of my new favourite places in London.