Slowing Down a Waterfall

I tried my hand at creating a misty water effect on a waterfall in the park yesterday. This is usually achieved by slowing down the shutter speed to allow the light into the lens for longer and creating a sense of movement as the water falls.

Here’s the fountain on a normal shutter speed. You can see that the water is frozen in time and is broken into droplets.

In this second photo where I slowed down the speed of the shutter you can see that the water looks continuous and misty, like flowing water.

The key thing with trying to create a misty effect is that you need a tripod to hold the camera completely still while the shutter closes, as any movement causes the photo to become blurry, like the second photo is a little as I was holding the camera in my hand trying to be still.

I’m pleased with the results so far but hopefully I’ll get more practice and a tripod so the next time I come decide to shoot a flowing river, rapid stream or just a pretty fountain I can aim to get some great photos.

What I’ve learnt so far

Image

When I started my blog a couple of months ago, my first post was about what I wanted this blog to be about and how I’d just started a photography course. I thought I’d now share some of what I’ve learnt as I have now done several units.

So far I have learnt what different photography terms mean and how to use them, and although I am still trying to put this to use in practice, it certainly makes you think about how to incorporate them into your photos.

For example, depth of field means to take a photo where the subject and the background are all kept in focus

Castle

I also found using different shutter speeds can help create different effects; so a fast shutter speed freezing a picture
Freeze

and a slower shutter speed allowing motion to be captured within the picture (sorry this one’s not great, I’m still practicing)

Motion

I think my favourite unit so far though has got to be the one explaining composition, and how placing the subject in the photo in a certain way can tell a story or guide a viewer through the image. Also how to make use of horizontal, vertical or diagonal lines to create a particular feeling. Vertical for enhancing feeling of height
Horizontal

horizontal for stability
horizontal1

or diagonal to draw the viewers eye through the image diagonal

I think I’ve always known most of this in my head, of how placing the subject in the frame in different ways can create various moods, and how making details stand out in different parts of an image can also draw the viewers eye in one way or another, but I am finding the course really helpful in just putting into words and better explaining to me how to make my photos stand out by thinking about what I’m trying to convey to the audience.

I’ll post my progress and learning as I continue through the course, and hopefully my photos will gradually improve as I go.